News from the Aurora University community

Industry leaders help develop hands-on chemistry major

chemistry

Since the John C. Dunham STEM Partnership School opened on the Aurora University campus in 2014, its third- through eighth-grade students have consistently demonstrated outstanding growth in science skills. To strengthen undergraduate science offerings at AU in a similar way, Chetna Patel, professor of chemistry and chair of Physical Sciences, and her colleagues, including assistant professors of chemistry Ami Johanson and Kyle McElhoney, initiated a chemistry major using the same model: working with external partners to develop the curriculum. The classes, which kicked off in fall 2018, are part of a hands-on program that is better preparing AU students for careers in the chemical industry.

John C. Dunham STEM Partnership School students take virtual field trip to the bottom of Geneva Lake

Seventh-grade students at the John C. Dunham STEM Partnership School at Aurora University last week took a “field trip” to explore shipwrecks at the bottom of Wisconsin’s Geneva Lake – all without leaving their classroom or even getting wet.

John C. Dunham STEM Partnership School students named finalists in national Bright Schools Competition

Eight middle school students who attend the John C. Dunham STEM Partnership School at Aurora University and their coach, Natalie Soelke, who teaches English and social studies at the school, have been named national finalists in the 2nd annual Bright Schools Competition.

Tellabs Foundation awards $1 million to Aurora University to fund facilities and scholarships for high school STEM initiative

The Tellabs Foundation recently awarded $1 million to develop, house and provide scholarships for a new STEM education program at Aurora University that is targeted at high school students.

AU’s STEM Partnership School isn’t just for kids

STEMstudent

There’s a great deal of learning going on at the John C. Dunham STEM Partnership School at Aurora University — and it’s not confined to the third- through eighth-graders who attend classes there.