Phillips Library and student groups will host Bone Marrow Drive on October 18

AU senior Angela Ozanic undergoes the donation process for her sister who suffers from acute myeloid leukemia

AU senior Angela Ozanic undergoes the donation process for her sister who suffers from acute myeloid leukemia.

On Thursday, October 18 from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. in the Dunham Atrium the Aurora University community and local public will have the opportunity to join the national bone marrow registry through the Be The Match Foundation and LifeSource, Chicagoland’s Blood Center.

Phillips Library, along with members of the Student Nurses’ Association, Gamma Phi Omega sorority, Black Student Union and Mu Sigma Pi, a health-related service organization, will be encouraging everyone to complete the registration process which consists of a simple swab of the inner cheek. It is the first step in finding out if you are the “one in a million” for someone who needs a match to save his or her life.

Those who are between the ages of 18 and 60, meet health guidelines and are willing to donate to any patient in need, can join the registry. It is free for anyone between the ages of 18 and 44 because they are called to donate 90 percent of the time. People ages 45 and 60 can still join the registry with a $100 payment—the amount it costs to add a new member to the registry.

If registrants are found to be a match they will be contacted for a marrow donation. Donating bone marrow used to be a painful, surgical procedure, but now most donations are similar to that of giving blood. This non-surgical procedure is called peripheral blood stem cell donation and donors go home from the hospital the same day they donate.

Anyone with questions about the procedure can talk to senior Angela Ozanic, a physical education major and student worker in Phillips Library. Ozanic has undergone the donation process four times for her sister who suffers from acute myeloid leukemia. She is ready and willing to donate again, and she is excited that more people will be added to the registry as a result of the drive.

“I saw a lot of young people in the oncology ward at Rush that were waiting for matches,” Ozanic said. “The donation process is not that difficult and it can save someone’s life.”

Ozanic can be reached at aozanic01@aurora.edu or visit www.marrow.org for additional information.